How to Support your Children During Exams

As the end of the year approaches, it is that time again to help your children to prepare for exams. It is essential for children to develop a strong work ethic and to learn time management skills during their school years.

These skills are transferable to life beyond school, such as tertiary studies as well as the working world. As a parent, you play a vital role in facilitating the development of these skills and attitudes.  Exam time is an important point at which these should be emphasized. Here are some of the ways you can do that.

It’s All in the Prep

It is not just about the exams themselves, but also the prep work done way before the exams even start. The whole year should be a time where you are encouraging good study habits and supporting your child in small tests, with homework and revising what they have been learning each day. This will help to reduce the workload when the time comes to revisit the whole year’s work for exams. What you are trying to teach here is that it is better to revise every day in order to stay up to speed with grasping and understanding content than having to go through an entire year’s work just before an exam, which can be extremely overwhelming.

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Get a Study Timetable Sorted

Study timetables are handy tools that can be used to make sure that your child is using their time wisely and dedicating sufficient time to all of their subjects, according to importance. Depending on your child’s aptitudes and interests, they may find certain subjects more challenging than others. It is therefore important to identify which subjects may require a little extra time than others and plan accordingly. A study timetable will help with time management and evaluating how much time is needed to be spent on each subject as well as the work that needs to be covered for each subject.

Take a Break!

Studying and being proactive with time also needs to be balanced out with taking a break – away from the books. Encourage your child to go for a run, take a walk outside, go to the beach or any other kind of outdoor activity to get their blood moving and to refresh and refocus their brain. There is no point in studying for hours on end without any break. Long study stints are not optimal for efficient information retention. Fresh air can do a world of good!

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Get into a Routine

Another way to refresh the mind is sleep. Sleep helps the brain to retain information and enables the body and mind to remain awake and alert. This is important as your brain needs to be awake when learning in order to take everything in. It is a good idea for your child’s bedtime to be at the same time every day, as this will ensure that they get enough sleep and can also better plan their study timetable. Having a set routine can also help your child to avoid procrastination.

Ask for Help

If you see your child battling in a particular subject, let them know that you are there to help them. If you aren’t able to, there are a lot of tutors and people that are available to assist. Make use of them. These can be private tutors, teachers, friends or siblings. Asking for help is better than letting your child suffer through content they don’t grasp. Another perspective or explanation of the subject might flick the switch in their brain.

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Exams can be a stressful time, but with the right tools and implementing the right habits, they don’t have to be. Encouraging and supporting your child will determine where they will be in the future. You set the standard and lay the groundwork, in the end, it’s up to them what they want to do with it.